Gifts and Collector's Items

Looking for a special gift for a Christian who loves the Bible?  The BibleMuseum.com store has unique items you won’t find at a Christian bookstore.  Give a gift that will be cherished for a lifetime and passed down from generation to generation!

 

First Edition King James 1611

First Edition King James Christian gift

 

As the Church celebrates the 400-year anniversary of the King James Bible, consider a framed First Edition King James leaf from a 1611 King James Bible fragment. These leafs were salvaged from a partially destroyed 1611 “she” Bible, and have been beautifully preserved in museum quality framing. There is a limited supplies, and favorite verses are going fast. Contact us today to see if your favorite verse is available!

Starting at $599

 

 

 

Close-up of First Edition King James Bible Page

First Edition King James 1611

 

King James 1661

King James Bible 1661

 

The famous printer, Christopher Barker, is responsible for this beautiful quarto edition of the King James Bible, printed in 1661 A.D. The pages themselves are hand made paper of 100% cotton rag and are in almost pristine condition, except for the slight and beautiful antiquing of the paper. The term cotton rag comes from the early days of printing when printers would buy rags from sellers in the street and then clean them and process them into paper - thus the term “cotton rag”. This edition of 1661 was probably used as a personal Bible. You will notice may unique spellings in the language of the time. Most noticeable is the use of a decorative “s” which looks very much like a “f” but if you look carefully you can see that on the decorative “s” the strike mark only goes to the left while on a “f” the strike mark goes all the way through. The red lines were hand drawn by a scribe before the Bible was bound.

Starting at $175

 

King James 1777

King James Bible

 

The year was 1777 and America was in the middle of the War of Independence when this beautiful Bible was printed in England. George III was on the throne in England and George Washington’s troops were facing the winter at Valley Forge. The King James Bible, originally printed in 1611 A.D. and called the “Authorized Version”, was not printed in America until 1781 A.D. after the Revolutionary War because English printers owned a monopoly on printing the English Bible. Therefore, this personal size Bible was printed in England by the royal printers. The pages themselves are hand made paper of 100% cotton rag and are in almost pristine condition, except for the beautiful antiquing of the paper.

Starting at $99

 

 

Geneva Bible 1587 A.D., 1589 A.D.

Geneva Bible Christian gift

 

The Geneva Bible was the result of the persecution under the reign of the daughter of Henry VIII, known as "Bloody Mary". The Reformation fires were burning hot in England and many great reformers fled England to the free city of Geneva for safety. It had been 20 years since the printing of the "Great Bible" in 1540 A.D. and the reformers such as Calvin, Knox and Beza set themselves to the task because a new translation was desperately needed. The resulting work was to be extremely popular with the Puritans and the common people as well as men like John Bunyan and William Shakespeare. First printed in 1560 A.D.,the Geneva Bible was printed as late as 1644 A.D. and holds the distinction of being the first Bible printed with verses. It also was the first Bible to come to America, landing with the Pilgrims at Cape Henry Virginia in 1607.

The Geneva Bible was also called the Breeches Bible because of the translation in Genesis 3:7 which says, “they sewed fig leaves together to make themselves breeches.” This particular fragment was printed just prior to the printing of the Authorized Version (better known as the King James Bible) and shows beautiful roman type. It is 389 years old.

The pages themselves are hand made paper of 100% cotton rag. The term cotton rag comes from the early days of printing when printers would buy rags from sellers in the street and then clean them and process them into paper - thus the term “cotton rag”. You will notice may unique spellings in the language of the time. Most noticeable is the use of a decorative “s” which looks very much like a “f” but if you look carefully you can see that on the decorative “s” the strike mark only goes to the left while on a “f” the strike mark goes all the way through.

Starting at $175